‘how the web works’ workshop feedback

i’ve been working at the glass room as an “inGenious” and taught an hour-long workshop there on saturday about how the web works. everyone who does a workshop has been sending feedback to everyone else so we can all be more prepared next time we teach. here’s what i said about mine:

hey! here’s feedback from the workshop i did saturday at 3pm:

there were a whole bunch of people (30-40?), so we couldn’t go around and do names/intros. but we did write our names on tape as name tags, which i found helpful and i hope they did too since they had to do an activity together.

i started with an intro and then asked what folks were interested in. the responses were generally either ‘knowing more about infrastructure’ or ‘knowing specific things to do to protect my privacy’

then, i handed out the internet infrastructure cards- about one set per 6-7 people, which i think worked okay. the groups finished laying everything out very quickly, like less than 10 minutes. i asked groups to share out how this activity went for them and there were a few sentiments:
– ‘i thought i knew how this worked, but when i had to lay everything out, i realized there were some gaps in my knowledge’
– ‘what’s a national gateway?’

– ‘why are there two computers?’

in general, i think the cards were really helpful for people. on reflection, and after reading the feedback forms, i think i should have spent more time going over each element in the set of cards instead of only having groups explain their own layouts. i think i also should have done a better job explaining why there are multiple right answers and your configuration could have routers, servers, etc in a different place than other groups.

after doing the big picture stuff, i showed some links that i put together: kaganjd.github.io/how-the-web-works

people were *really* into the submarine cable map!

i used that + infrastructure cards to say that the internet is physical and that there are different places along the line where info can be intercepted. then, i went into vpn vs. tor vs. https. i explained a little bit of the technical stuff and tried to just reiterate over and over again that people should def get ‘https everywhere’ (free!) and try a 2-week free trial of cloak vpn. people had fairly technical questions about vpn’s- how do they work? do i need one at home? does it encrypt everything? etc., so i’d be ready for that (many thx to sara for helping me navigate those!)

there were 2 kinda derailer/mansplainy guys. a way i tried to address them was listen for a little bit, nod my head, and then try to tie something they said back to something someone said earlier or a question someone else asked. then, i could shift the mic to the new person and we could eventually get back on track.

so yeah! it was fun! if you’re teaching this one and have q’s about any of this, let me know!